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Lost Fuchsia: Duchess of Fife

Today’s lost fuchsia is ‘Duchess of Fife’, which was introduced in 1892.

We know very little about this cultivar and are hoping that our fuchsia detectives will  help us to find more information about this historic cultivar.

On this occasion the partner named fuchsia ‘Duke of Fife’, doesn’t appear to have been introduced by James Lye (like the Duke of Albany and Duchess of Albany) instead the ‘Duke of Fife’ appears to have been introduced by another keen fuchsia grower, Edward Banks (from Sholden Hall, Kent) in 1894.

As we know very little about this cultivar,  we are providing some information about the person we believe James may have named the cultivar after in the hope that this may lead to some further information.

We suspect that the fuchsia cultivar ‘Duchess of Fife’ is named after the 2nd Duchess who was born in 1891.    Princess Arthur of Connaught, 2nd Duchess of Fife, RRC, GCStJ (Alexandra Victoria Alberta Edwina Louise Duff).  Alexandra was a granddaughter of King Edward VII and great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria.

The  titles and styles of the 2nd Duchess of Fife:

  • 17 May 1891 – 9 November 1905: Lady Alexandra Duff
  • 9 November 1905 – 29 January 1912: Her Highness Princess Alexandra
  • 29 January 1912 – 15 October 1913: Her Highness Princess Alexandra, Duchess of Fife
  • 15 October 1913 – 26 February 1959: Her Royal Highness Princess Arthur of Connaught, Duchess of Fife

It is possible that James named the cultivar after Alexandra’s mother, Louise, Princess Royal and Duchess of Fife (Louise Victoria Alexandra Dagmar), Louise was the third child and the eldest daughter of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra.

The titles and styles of the 1st Duchess of Fife:

  • 20 February 1867 – 27 July 1889: Her Royal Highness Princess Louise of Wales
  • 27 July 1889 – 22 January 1901: Her Royal Highness Princess Louise, Duchess of Fife
  • 22 January 1901 – 9 November 1905: Her Royal Highness The Princess Louise, Duchess of Fife
  • 9 November 1905 – 4 January 1931: Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal

Additional Clues on where this cultivar has previously been listed to help our detectives:

Mentioned in the Dobbies Catalogue, 1893

We hope that our fuchsia detectives will help us find more information about this fuchsia cultivar, including any information relating to when it was first listed or when it was last listed in a nursery catalogue or publication.  Does it appear just in publications in the UK or elsewhere in Europe?

Any information you can share, will help us and other fuchsia detectives helping us in the search.

#lostfuchsias #harperdebbage #fife #queenvictoria #nationalplantcollection #plantheritage #wiltshire

 

 

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Lost Fuchsia: Crimson Globe

Today’s lost fuchsia is ‘Crimson Globe’, which was introduced in 1879 (Though we suspect that it may have been introduced slightly earlier).

The Gardeners Chronicle (29/11/1879) – provides a brief description of this cultivar and refers to the colour plate published by the Floral Magazine in September 1879.

The image and description from the Floral Magazine, can be found in one of our earlier posts

The Gardeners Chronicle mentioned this cultivar again in 1885 in a report on the Fuchsia Trails at Chiswick. This item also mentions ‘Ellen Lye’ and ‘Charming’.

Some Additional Clues to help our detectives:

  • Mentioned in the John Forbes Catalogue, 1885
  • Mentioned in the Laings Catalogue, c1890

We hope that our fuchsia #detectives will help us find more information about this #fuchsia cultivar including information relating to its first listing, and when it was last seen or listed in a nursery catalogue or publication.

Any information you can share will help us and other fuchsia detectives helping us in the search.

#lostfuchsias #wiltshire #nationalplantcollection #harperdebbage #fuchsias #horticulture #flowershow #chiswick #nursery #catalogue

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Lost Fuchsia: Walter Long

We believe that this fuchsia is named after Walter Hume Long, who was born in Bath in 1854, and married Lady Dorothy (Doreen) Blanche, daughter of Richard Boyle, 9th Earl of Cork, in 1878. Walter died in 1924 at Rood Ashton House in Wiltshire.

During his political career which spanned over 40 years, Walter held office as President of the Board of Agriculture, President of the Local Government Board, Chief Secretary for Ireland, Secretary of State for the Colonies and First Lord of the Admiralty. He is also remembered for his links with Irish Unionism, and served as Leader of the Irish Unionist Party in the House of Commons from 1906 to 1910.

He was appointed Lord-Lieutenant of Wiltshire in February 1920, and was raised to the peerage as Viscount Long of Wraxall in the County of Wiltshire in May 1921.

Note:
The Royal Commission on Agriculture, meet at Trowbridge on 18 January 1893.

Some Clues:
The Fuchsia Cultivar ‘Walter Long’ appeared in the following nursery catalogues, John Forbes (1888), B S Williams (1888), W J Bull (1889-93), H. Cannell (1892). We would love to see images of these catalogue entries, with references in the Gardeners Chronicle and Gardeners Oracle.

We hope that our fuchsia #detectives will help us find more information about this #fuchsia cultivar including information relating to its first listing, when it was last seen or listed in a #nursery catalogue. Is it possible there was another Walter Long in Wiltshire who this cultivar could be named after? Any information you can share will help others in the search.

#lostfuchsias #wiltshire #nationalplantcollection #harperdebbage #fuchsias #horticulture #flowershow #cannell #williams #bull #forbes #wraxall #viscount #bath #earl #cork #agriculture

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Lost Fuchsia: C. N. May

C. N. May (Charles Neale May, born in Reading). Mr May was instrumental in resurrecting the Devizes Flower Show, in 1880 (Devizes Horticultural Society). In 1882 the show was held on the 7th August at Roundway Park, the residence of C. E. Colston, Esq.

Charles May founded with Mr Brown, ‘Brown and May’ a North Wiltshire Foundry based in Devizes in 1854, which was the largest employer in the area, and exported its machinery all over the world. Charles was Mayor of Devizes in 1868. By 1871 he and his wife lived at Spittlecroft House.

In 1889 he was listed as a Director of ‘The North Wilts Dairy Company Limited’, of Elm Lodge, Devizes and was a JP (Justice of the Peace) for the borough of Devizes. Charles died in 1908 and is buried at St. James, Southbroom, Devizes. During the period 1891-1908 he appears to be living Seaton, East Devon.

The Fuchsia Cultivar ‘C. N. May’ appears in the following nursery catalogues, W J Bull, B S Williams, John Forbes. We would love to see images of these catalogue entries.

We hope that our fuchsia #detectives will help us find more information about this #fuchsia cultivar including information relating to its first listing or when it was last seen or listed in a #nursery catalogue. Any information you can share will help others in the search.

#lostfuchsias #wiltshire #nationalplantcollection #harperdebbage #fuchsias #horticulture #reading #devizes #devon #seaton #southbroom #flowershow #engineer #foundry #brownandmay #roundwaypark #forbes #machinery #director #reading

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Lost Fuchsia: James Welch

Today’s lost fuchsia is ‘James Welch’, James was born in 1856 and married Annie Earle in London in 1887. The Fuchsia Annie Earle has survived and is held within our Plant Heritage, National Plant Collection. We would love to find James so that we can reunite the couple.

James was the Secretary of the Wiltshire Agricultural Association (Society) for many years and a founder member of the Market Lavington Parish Council and its chairman from 1915-1919).

The Fuchsia Cultivar ‘James Welch’ appeared several times in the Gardeners Chronicle first in 1885 as a new fuchsia for 1886, and had listings in following nursery catalogue’s, John Forbes, Dobbies, W J Bull, B S Williams. We would love to see these listings..

We hope that our fuchsia #detectives will help us find more information about this #fuchsia cultivar including information relating to its first listing or when it was last seen or listed in a #nursery catalogue. Any information you can share will help others in the search.

#lostfuchsias #wiltshire #nationalplantcollection #harperdebbage #fuchsias #horticulture #trowbridge #bath #cultivar #agricultural #marketlavington #gardeners, #dobbies, #forbes #welch #london

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Lost Fuchsia: Hon. Mrs Hay

‘Hon. Mrs Hay’ is named after James Lye’s employer, Hon. Mrs. Louisa Hay (nee. Pleydell Bouverie).

Louisa was the daughter of Captain (afterwards Admiral) the Hon. Duncombe Pleydell-Bouverie, (son of the 2nd Earl of Radnor of Longford Castle) and Louisa May.

Louisa married Captain Hon. Samuel Hay (son of the 17th Earl of Erroll of Slains Castle) in 1832. Louisa spent nearly all her life at Clyffe Hall.

We know this fuchsia cultivar was exhibited at horticultural shows at Trowbridge and Bath and received prizes.

We hope that our fuchsia #detectives will help us find more information about this #fuchsia cultivar including information relating to its first listing or when it was last seen or listed in a #nursery catalogue. Any information you can share will help others in the search.

#lostfuchsias #wiltshire #nationalplantcollection #harperdebbage #fuchsias #horticulture #earl #Radnor #Erroll #longsford #castle #slains #clan #hay #pleydell #bouverie #trowbridge #bath #cultivar

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Lost Fuchsia: Mrs Hooper Taylor

Mrs Hooper Taylor (Betty) had links to the Bath Floral Fete and Band Committee and the Clifton and Trowbridge Horticultural Societies. She resided in Bath with her Husband Mr Hooper Tayor (Robert), who we will be highlighting in due course.

We hope that you will help us find more information about this #fuchsia cultivar and any information relating to its introduction or when it was last seen or listed in a #nursery catalogue.

#lostfuchsias #wiltshire #nationalplantcollection #harperdebbage #fuchsias #bath #trowbridge #horticulture #clifton #society

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Lost Fuchsia: Duke of Albany

The Duchess of Albany is looking for her lost Duke.

We are not sure when the ‘Duke of Albany’ disappeared from cultivation, and are hoping that our #detectives are able to help us reunite the couple.

The Dukedom was create in 1881 for the fourth son of Queen Victoria, and we suspect that the cultivars ‘Duke of Albany’ & ‘Duchess of Albany’ were introduced earlier that currently know date of 1885 to commemorate their marriage (Princess Helena of Waldeck and Pyrmont and Prince Leopold) in 1882.

We hope that you will help us find more information about this #fuchsia cultivar and any information relating to it’s introduction or when it was last seen or listed in a #nursery catalogue.

#lostfuchsias #wiltshire #albany #duke #duchess #nationalplantcollection #claremont #royalfamily #harperdebbage #fuchsias #prince #royal #queenvictoria #victoria #queen

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New Fuchsias – The Floral Magazine – 1880

Plate 426. NEW FUCHSIAS

If the signs of improvement in the Fuchsia are less marked than they were twenty years ago, it is because the average standard of excellence is high, and advances are less striking than they were before the quality of the flower was so much improved.  But as there is no limit to the progress florists can make, and as there is an infinite variety of form and colour, it is well that florists are still found at work seeking to realize more advanced standards.

The new varieties now figured were rasised by Mr. James Lye, of Market Lavington, Wilts, and have recieved high awards at the leading exhibitions in the West of England.  Mrs. Hooper Taylor (fig.1) is a charming light variety, with stout well-formed tube and sepals, and a pleasing pink corolla.  Mr. Hooper Taylor (fig. 2) is a dark variety of the finest quality, with rich coral-red tube and sepals, and magenta-purple corolla. Fairy Queen (fig. 3) is a very novel and distinct variety, with white tube and sepals, and magenta-pink corolla.  The habit growth in each case is all that could be desired, and we are confident these new varieties will be in demand for exhibition and decorative purposes.

Taken From: The Floral Magazine, 1880. Plate 426.